Recipient, Colton Thompson, will Attend Colorado State University in Fall 2020 to Pursue a Construction Management Degree

The Youth Clinic has named Colton Thompson as the 2020 recipient of its Growing Healthy Kids High School Scholarship. The Loveland High School senior’s primary provider is Dr. Beth Ballard, MD, who has been a pediatrician at The Youth Clinic since 2000.

Thompson was diagnosed with a rare birth defect known as Fibular Hemimelia which creates a limb length discrepancy as well as foot deformities. Nine surgeries and counting later, he hasn’t let this condition hold him back from leading a fulfilling and active lifestyle.

“This birth defect has affected me every day but has made me into the hard-working and independent person I am today,” said Thompson. “Most would think these things would ruin my life or make it so I could not do a lot of physical exercises but I continue to prove them wrong every day. Every time I have surgery, I believe it makes me stronger because I have to fight that much more to get back to doing all the things I love.”

As a naturally driven person, Thompson discovered his strong perseverance by facing life’s challenges head-on. “These surgeries have made me into someone who always enjoys life and is always looking to better myself,” said Thompson. “Every time I find out I have another surgery scheduled I try to plan out all of the things I have dreamed of doing and things that I won’t be able to do for a while after having surgery. Then I try to make them all happen. My goal is to always come back better and healthier than before the surgery.”

With the help of The Youth Clinic’s $1,000 scholarship, Thompson will be able to pursue a degree in Construction Management at Colorado State University to one day lead his own business.

“After school, I plan on working for a construction company and working my way up. My final goal and dream would be to start a construction company and be able to work for my self,” said Thompson.

The Youth Clinic Growing Healthy Kids High School Scholarship application requires students to turn in an essay describing a time he or she had to overcome a challenge. Essays are scored based on theme and content, organization and development, grammar, mechanics, and style.

“Being born with Fibular Hemimelia has had its fair share of ups and downs but it has shaped me into the hardworking and driven person I am today,” said Thompson in his scholarship essay penned to Fibular Hemimelia. “I would not change a thing about me as this birth effect has defined who my identity is and will be into the future.”

For additional information about the Growing Healthy Kids High School Scholarship program visit www.youthclinic.com/scholarship.